Hisashi Abe
Hisashi Abe

Dr. Hisashi Abe received his PhD degree in physics from Kanazawa University. After working at the National Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research and the National Institute for Resources and Environment as a postdoctoral fellow, he joined the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST) in 2001 and has been working on humidity standards. He was a visiting researcher at Nicolaus Copernicus University in 2009. He is the vice chair of the working group for humidity (WG-Hu) in the Consultative Committee of Thermometry (CCT), chair of the Technical Committee of Thermometry (TCT) in the Asia Pacific Metrology Programme (APMP), and the leader of the working group for humidity in the APMP TCT. His current research interest is the development of reliable techniques for humidity measurement using laser spectroscopy. 

Dr. Thinh Q. Bui
Dr. Thinh Q. Bui

Dr. Thinh Q. Bui received his PhD in chemical physics at Caltech (Pasadena, CA) in 2016 and was an NRC post-doctoral fellow at JILA/University of Colorado, Boulder until 2019 when he started his career at NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. Prior to NIST, his training was on fundamental collision dynamics, interactions, and structure of atoms and molecules, relying on optical methods (ultrafast lasers, frequency combs) for spectroscopic interrogation. At NIST, his work transitioned to the development of magnetic imaging instrumentation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles for sensing and thermometry. His other interests at NIST include the development of photonic sensors for pressure and temperature, and calibrated radiometric sources as an artificial star for astronomy/astrophysics in collaboration with NASA Goddard. 

Dr. XiaoJuan Feng
Dr. XiaoJuan Feng

Dr. XiaoJuan Feng received PhD and bachelor’s degrees from the Department of Thermal Engineering in Tsinghua University in 2010 and 2005, respectively. She joined the National Institute of Metrology (NIM) in July 2010 and is now the group leader of NIM’s contact thermometry group. She has worked on cylindrical acoustic gas thermometry for the determination of the Boltzmann constant, thermodynamic temperature, temperature measurement techniques using nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, and cryogenic fixed points. She was a guest researcher at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, MD, from Feb. 2012 to Jan. 2013 and from March to May 2017 in collaboration with Dr. Michael Moldover and Dr. Keith Gillis. 

Christof Gaiser
Dr. Christof Gaiser

Dr. Christof Gaiser received his diploma degree in physics at the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin in the field of optical and electrical properties of semiconductors in 2003. Since 2004 he is with the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Berlin and received his doctor degree in 2008 in physics in the field of thermophysical properties of helium at low temperatures and gas thermometry. Since 2007 he dedicated his work to the determination of the Boltzmann constant as basis for redefining the SI base unit kelvin. He managed the international “Boltzmann project” which was the starting point for worldwide experiments leading to the successful redefinition of the kelvin in 2019. He is the head of the PTB working group “Cryo-and Primary Thermometry” and the chairman of the CCT working group on contact thermometry. 

Dr. Kenneth T V Grattan
Dr. Kenneth T V Grattan

Dr. Kenneth T V Grattan graduated in Physics from The Queen’s University of Belfast with a BSc, followed by a PhD in Laser Physics in the use of laser-probe techniques for measurements on potential new dye laser systems. He became a Research Fellow at the Imperial College of Science and Technology where he worked on advanced photolytic drivers for novel laser systems. Subsequently, he joined City, University of London, was appointed Professor of Measurement and Instrumentation and Head of the Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering. His research interests are wide and include the use of fiber optic and optical systems in the measurement of a range of physical and chemical parameters for industrial applications. He was awarded a DSc from City University London for his work in sensor systems. He was President of the Institute of Measurement & Control in 2000. He was awarded the Calendar Medal and the Honeywell Prize of the Institute of Measurement and Control and the Applied Optics Divisional Prize of the Institute of Physics in 2010 and is now Director of City’s Institute of Sensors & Instrumentation. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2008 and holds a Royal Academy of Engineering Research Chair in Scientific Instrumentation at City. He was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2018. He is the author of over 700 publications in major international Journals and a similar number at key Conferences worldwide and is the co-editor of a five-volume topical series on Optical Fibre Sensor Technology. 

Dr. Graham Machin
Dr. Graham Machin

Dr. Graham Machin FREng, BSc (Hons), DPhil (Oxon), DSc, CPhys, CEng, FInstP, FIPEM, FInstMC is an NPL Senior Fellow. He has more than 30 years’ thermometry research experience and has published more than 250 papers and given numerous keynote addresses. He is visiting Professor at Strathclyde, Surrey, and Birmingham Universities and Colaborador Honorifico at Valladolid University in Spain. Dr. Machin represents the UK on the Consultative Committee of Thermometry (CCT), chairs the CCT working group for Noncontact thermometry and led the recent update of the 10-year CCT Strategy. He was President of the UK Institute of Measurement and Control (2018-2019), chair of the Euramet Technical Committee for Thermometry (2014-2018), and served on the UK EPSRC Physical Sciences Strategic Advisory Team (2014-2017). Dr. Graham has received the Callendar medal from the Institute of Measurement & Control (InstMC) for “outstanding contributions to temperature measurement” and in 2019 was elected Honorary Scientist of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. In 2021 he was awarded the InstMC Harold Hartley medal for outstanding contributions to the technology of measurement and control. He is currently director of the 21-partner Euramet “Realising the redefined kelvin” project, leads NPL’s metrology activity in nuclear decommissioning, and chairs the “UK Body Temperature Measurement Group.”

Dr. Jonathan Pearce
Dr. Jonathan Pearce

Dr. Jonathan Pearce leads the contact thermometry technical area of the Temperature & Humidity Group at the UK’s National Physical Laboratory. He is also Head of Science for the Thermal and Radiometric Metrology department. He has published over 160 articles on measurement issues. Research highlights include the development of new thermocouples and high temperature fixed points for contact thermometry, characterising uncertainty contributions of standard platinum resistance thermometry and fixed points used as temperature standards, introducing new techniques for overcoming calibration drift including self-validating sensors, low-drift thermometry, supporting the development of practical primary Johnson noise thermometry, and developing digital approaches to temperature metrology. He is the UK representative on the EURAMET Technical Committee for Thermometry (TC-T) and represents the UK in various BIPM Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT) and EURAMET TC-T working groups. He serves on standards committees including BSI and IEC. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Physics.

Dr. David M. Romps
Dr. David M. Romps

Dr. David M. Romps is a Professor of Climate Physics in the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at UC Berkeley and a Faculty Scientist in the Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He studies the fundamental physics of climate and educates students and the public about global warming. Dr. Romps received a BS in math and a BS/MS in physics from Yale University and a PhD in physics from Harvard University. Motivated by concerns about climate change, he left the field of string theory to work on climate policy at the Woods Hole Research Center and on atmospheric dynamics at Harvard’s Center for the Environment. He then joined the faculty at UC Berkeley and currently teaches the popular course Introduction to Climate Change.

Dr. Patrick Rourke
Dr. Patrick Rourke

Dr. Patrick Rourke received his PhD from the University of Toronto and held a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Bristol before joining the National Research Council Canada in 2012 as an NRC Metrology Research Officer in the Thermometry & Radiometry team. His research focuses are primary thermometry and temperature scales, including recent work on the reproducibility of the International Temperature Scale of 1990, alternatives to mercury fixed points, refractive-index gas metrology, and acoustic gas thermometry. Dr. Rourke represents Canada internationally as national delegate to the CIPM Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT), member of the CCT Working Group for Contact Thermometry, and the inaugural chairperson of the CCT Task Group on Digitalization.

 

Dr. Steffen Rudtsch
Dr. Steffen Rudtsch

Dr. Steffen Rudtsch has a university degree in physics and a PhD in thermophysics. After 12 years as the head of the thermophysical properties laboratory at the Brandenburg Technical University at Cottbus he joined Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in 1999. He worked as a guest researcher at NIST (USA) and NIM (China) and is now head of the Temperature department at PTB. He serves as chair of the EURAMET Technical Committee for Thermometry, PTB representative on the BIPM Consultative Committee for Thermometry (CCT), and member and chair of several working groups and committees within CCT, EURAMET, COOMET, IMEKO, DIN, DKE, DKD, and DAkkS. Dr. Rudtsch has an extensive list of scientific publications and has made several contributions to scientific books on thermometry and thermophysical property measurements. He has given numerous lectures around the world and received the Netzsch Award of the European Thermophysical Properties Conference in 1999.

Dr. Mohamed Sadli
Dr. Mohamed Sadli

Dr. Mohamed Sadli is the head of the temperature division of LNE and oversees the research activities in thermometry at the joint laboratory for metrology LNE-Cnam. After a Master’s Degree in Solid-State Physics, he earned a PhD degree in Metrology at Cnam in 1997, focusing on the study of the applications of pressure-controlled heat-pipes in thermometry. He joined the radiation thermometry group of LNE-Cnam after the PhD to lead the research and calibration activities in this area. His current research activities are primary thermometry, high-temperature fixed points, radiation thermometry, and thermocouples. He authored or co-authored more than 150 research articles and communications. He represents France at the CCT, EURAMET TC-T and IMEKO TC-12. He contributes to the activities of CCT “Non-Contact Thermometry” working group, leads the EURAMET TC-T “Strategy” working group as well as the task group devoted to a new CCT guide on industrial radiation thermometry. He coordinates the high-temperature research in the European joint research project Real-K.

Louise Wright
Louise Wright

Following an MA in Mathematics from Cambridge University, an MSc in Mathematical Modelling and Numerical Analysis from Oxford University and four years working in industry, Louise Wright joined the National Physical Laboratory in 1999. Her main area of expertise is in numerical simulation of measurement experiments, and her current interests include digital twins and virtual testing. She is NPL’s Head of Digital Metrology, with responsibility for championing digital approaches across the scientific areas in the laboratory and enabling technical knowledge of digitalisation processes to be shared between different areas of measurement. She currently chairs the EURAMET working group on Metrology for Digitalisation (M4D) and the NAFEMS Computational Structural Mechanics Working Group.